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GTD Mastery 100: Step 16

To read my complete journey to GTD Mastery see the main post.

I haven’t decided on a paper filing system yet, but your comments have been insightful. If you haven’t already, feel free to share your paper filing system here. You are on my waiting for list =D. Nevertheless, the journey continues.

Step 16 to GTD Mastery is: I only have physical actions on my Next Actions lists—no multi-step projects.

I used to struggle with this until I made pruning my next actions part of my weekly review. This prevents the “amorphous blob of stuff” that one of David Allen’s seminar attendees coined. Looking at my next actions list doesn’t make me cringe anymore.

BLABLA

Here are the posts that have helped me create effective to-do lists.

Merlin Mann on Building a Smarter To-Do List: Part 1 and Part 2
Gina Trapani on “The art of the doable to-do list“.

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Related posts:

  1. GTD Mastery 100: Step 8
  2. GTD Mastery 100: Step 9
  3. GTD Mastery 100: Step 12
  4. GTD Mastery 100: Call for Help
  5. GTD Mastery 100: Step 11

2 Responses to “GTD Mastery 100: Step 16”

  1. Kyle W. says:

    This is a very important step in the GTD process because if you don’t just have physical actions on your Next Actions list you will get bogged down. Those are excellent resources also in managing you next actions list. These sites were also helpful to me in guiding what should go on my Next Action list and what shouldn’t.

    http://webworkerdaily.com/2007/10/02/task-list-antipatterns/
    http://www.productivity501.com/habit-list/308/

    The second link I just used for reference to and not actually making the habit list. Hopefully those links provide more assistance for Step 16.

  2. Chris Y. says:

    Thanks for the links. I actually signed up for Productivity501′s habit list testing. Looking forward to your blog.